Ideas and Resources to Support Your Child’s Behavior at School

A Brief Overview Behavior specialists generally agree that difficult behaviors arise from unmet needs. How adults respond is critical if a child is going to learn new ways to communicate. Humans spend about 80 percent of their brain energy trying to belong. This can explain a lot when a child with a disability feels isolated Read More

Mental Health Education and Support at School can be Critical

A Brief Overview Two Washington students die from suicide each week. In a typical high-school classroom of about 30 students, chances are high that 2-3 students have attempted suicide in the past year. Read on for more detail from the 2018 statewide Healthy Youth Survey. Approximately one in five youth experience a mental illness before Read More

Response to Intervention (RTI) – Support for Struggling Students

Brief overview Students struggle in school for different reasons. RTI is an acceptable way of identifying students with learning disabilities. RTI isn’t a specific program or type of teaching. RTI works on a tier system with three levels of intervention. Full Article Students struggle in school for different reasons. Response to Intervention (RTI)  can help Read More

Child Find: Schools Have a Legal Duty to Evaluate Children Impacted by Disability

A Brief Overview School districts have an affirmative duty to locate, evaluate and potentially serve any infant, toddler or school-aged student impacted by disability under the Child Find Mandate — part of special education law. Adequate marks and “passing from grade to grade” does not erase the school’s responsibility to evaluate under Child Find. School Read More

Children’s Long-Term Inpatient Program (CLIP) Provides Residential Psychiatric Treatment

A Brief Overview CLIP serves children ages 5-18 by providing residential mental-health treatment for a long-term stay that usually lasts 6-12 months. Read on for more information about CLIP eligibility and how to initiate a referral. Governor Jay Inslee in December recommended $675 million in new funding for behavioral health improvements statewide, and policymakers are Read More