IEP Tips: Evaluation, Present Levels, SMART goals

Getting services at school starts with evaluation. Eligible students get an individualized Education Program (IEP), which describes a student’s present levels of performance and how specially designed instruction supports progress toward annual goals. This article provides a quick overview of the basic IEP process and provides tips for family caregivers to get more involved. PAVE Read More

Evaluations Part 1: Where to Start When a Student Needs Special Help at School

A Brief Overview Full Article If a student is having a hard time at school and has a known or suspected disability, the school evaluates to see if the student qualifies for special education. A child is protected in their right to be evaluated by the Child Find Mandate, which is part of the federal Read More

Sample Letter to Request Evaluation

A Brief Overview Full Article When a student is struggling in school and there is reason to suspect the challenges are disability related, anyone can refer the student for an educational evaluation. If the evaluation shows that the student is eligible, services are provided through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Washington State requires special education Read More

Evaluations Part 2: Next Steps if the School Says ‘No’

A Brief Overview Full Article Parents have a variety of choices if the school denies a request to evaluate a student for special education or if the school does an evaluation and finds the student ineligible for services through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Here are some options to consider. Is disability a factor? A student qualifies for IEP services when three Read More

Exploring Assistive Technology: Understanding, Access, and Resources for All Ages and Abilities

Brief overview: Full Article You can also type “assistive technology” in the search bar at wapave.org to find other articles where assistive technology is mentioned. What is assistive technology (AT)? Who uses it? Where is it used?Assistive technology (AT) is any item, device, or piece of equipment used by people with disabilities to maintain or Read More

Special Education Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if my child has a developmental delay? If you suspect that your child might have a developmental delay, you should talk with your child’s pediatrician. They may conduct a developmental screening. Where can I learn more about tracking milestones? The Learn the Signs. Act Early website includes tools for tracking milestones Read More

Special Education Terms

Glossary of Terms Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR): also known simply as dispute resolution or procedural safeguards; options for resolving disagreements between parents and school districts; Washington’s options include facilitation, mediation, community complaint, and due process hearing. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): the federal law that makes it unlawful to discriminate against individuals with disabilities in Read More

Ages 3-5 Transition Toolkit

A Guide to Washington Services for 3-5 Year Olds with Disabilities New parents have a lot to manage. Concern about whether a child’s growth and development are on track can be confusing. This toolkit provides places to begin if caregivers suspect that a baby or young child may need services due to a developmental delay Read More

Steps to Read, Develop, and Understand an IEP Worksheet

The IEP document is a lot to absorb. You will be better prepared to support your child when you review the IEP draft before meeting with the IEP team for the first time. A child’s education is worth taking time to read for understanding. Subject Service Minutes What Related/Ancillary Services is your child eligible to Read More

What to Expect at the Transition Conference: Going from Part C to Part B

You can utilize this document when preparing for the transition planning process to collect essential Part C data that will be taken into account during the Part B evaluation and eligibility determination phase. Adapted from the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (ECTA) This article forms part of the 3-5 Transition Toolkit

Differences Between Part B and Part C Services

The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) ends when a child turns 3. Transitioning to a services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP) requires a new evaluation and is a team-led process. Let this handout serve as your cheat sheet for the differences between the IFSP and IEP. Individualized Family Service Plan(IFSP) Individualized Education Program(IEP) Ages: Read More

Pathways to Support: Where to Begin If Your Child Receives Services Through Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT)

When an infant or toddler receiving early intervention services from Washington’s Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT) program approaches the age of three (3), the Family Resource Coordinator (FRC) begins transition planning for when the child will age out of early intervention services on their third birthday. If the child is potentially eligible for Read More

Early Learning Toolkit: Overview of Services for Families of Young Children

Presenting our newest resource – the 3-5 Transition Toolkit – A guide to Washington services for 3-5 year olds with disabilities. This toolkit encompasses a collection of our informative articles, complemented by sample letters to provide you with a solid foundation as you navigate through this crucial transition period. New parents have a lot to Read More

Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP), Part 1: What Makes a Military Family Exceptional?

A Brief Overview Full Article The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory program for all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces that helps military dependents with special medical or educational needs. The Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Space Force each have an Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP). The Coast Guard, which Read More