College Experience Terms: Non Degree Post-Secondary Transition Programs

The following information is part of the college readiness workbook. You can download this and other parts of this workbook for your personal use. Each document is fillable. These are some terms for post-secondary education programs that are unique to those supporting students with intellectual disabilities. Click on each term for more information. Transition and Read More

Prior Written Notice (PWN): An Important Document to Read and Understand  

A Brief Overview Full Article When family members and school staff meet to discuss a student’s services, certain things have to happen. One requirement is for the school to take notes and share those notes with the family within a reasonable amount of time (usually a few days) after the meeting. Those notes are formatted Read More

PAVE Provides Sample Letters to Support Families in their Advocacy

An advocate is someone who works toward a cause or goal. Sometimes the hardest part of advocacy is figuring out what to do next. When a child has unmet needs at school, family advocates can seek changes to a student’s services by asking for an evaluation, a meeting, a behavioral assessment, or something else. Putting Read More

Military Family Resources for Youth and Young Adults Transitioning from High School

The links below will help you find resources for employment or post-high school education in any state to which you may move. NEW: Directory-University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDDs) Directory of LEND programs Employment Employment Center at your installation (check out the installation website-under Morale, Welfare and Recreation) List of Vocational Rehabilitation agencies Read More

Can I still walk with my classmates at the end of my Senior Year, if I participate in a transition plan?

Information on Transition Plans Students often ask the question “If I participate in a transition plan between the age of 18-21, does that mean I can still walk with my classmates at the end of my senior, or fourth, year?”  The answer is a resounding YES!! In 2005 State Legislation passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill Read More

When will my Student Graduate?

Dear Reader, There seems to be some confusion about “When will my student graduate?”  Here’s an attempt to clarify some questions and make the transition to adult life a little easier. First, there is a difference between “Graduation” and “Exiting” the public school system.  Graduation includes walking with your classmates while wearing a cap and Read More

Stress and Children Ages 0-3

“The perception of stress varies from child to child; serious threats may not disturb one child, while minor ones may be traumatic to another” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2015). Parents can’t know how stress will affect their child.  Just like adults experiencing something new, the effect of stress is different for each toddler or infant. Read More

Choosing Colleges for Success: Finding Schools That Pay Attention

Pay attention to what? Pay attention to the highly-diverse needs and abilities of learners! Higher education schools don’t have the same legal obligations as public schools when it comes to providing individualized education plans, and they don’t have the same history of changing instruction and adapting teaching for different learning needs and abilities.  They ARE Read More

Justin’s Transition to College

My name is Sybille and I’m the parent of a 22 year old son, Justin, who is diagnosed with high functioning autism. I would like to share our experience with transition from high school to adulthood, as well as share a couple resources that have helped us tremendously. Justin was introduced to the Division of Read More

College Considerations for People with Disabilities: An Interview with Troy Peterson, TCC Access Services

As we continue to further understand disabilities and those who experience them, continued education is becoming more of a reality for people who, in the past, might never have completed high school. Going to college no longer seems out of the question, and we’re happy to see more individuals with disabilities pushing themselves and excelling Read More