Special Education Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if my child has a developmental delay? If you suspect that your child might have a developmental delay, you should talk with your child’s pediatrician. They may conduct a developmental screening. Where can I learn more about tracking milestones? The Learn the Signs. Act Early website includes tools for tracking milestones Read More

Special Education Terms

Glossary of Terms Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR): also known simply as dispute resolution or procedural safeguards; options for resolving disagreements between parents and school districts; Washington’s options include facilitation, mediation, community complaint, and due process hearing. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): the federal law that makes it unlawful to discriminate against individuals with disabilities in Read More

Communication Log

Maintaining a clear record of who said what and when is simplified with a school communication log. This tool streamlines the organization and retrieval of your notes pertaining to phone calls, letters, face-to-face meetings, emails exchanged with your child’s teachers, and any other interactions involving the school. For parents of children with an Individualized Education Read More

Preparing for Productive and Effective Conversations with Education and Service Providers

Here are our top three tips for making every conversation with your child’s IFSP or IEP team an opportunity to show them what makes your child the remarkable human being you know and love. Strengths Needs Things my child does that make me feel happy or unconcerned Things that my child does or cannot do Read More

What You Need To Know About My Child

Using the guiding questions below, prepare a one-pager of skills, challenges, concerns, and interests of your child on the next page. Make your own print friendly one Pager. Hello My Name is (Insert name) I am (insert age) years old. My strengths are… Some important things you should know about me are… I respond well Read More

Steps to Read, Develop, and Understand an IEP Worksheet

The IEP document is a lot to absorb. You will be better prepared to support your child when you review the IEP draft before meeting with the IEP team for the first time. A child’s education is worth taking time to read for understanding. Subject Service Minutes What Related/Ancillary Services is your child eligible to Read More

Differences Between Part B and Part C Services

The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) ends when a child turns 3. Transitioning to a services under an Individualized Education Program (IEP) requires a new evaluation and is a team-led process. Let this handout serve as your cheat sheet for the differences between the IFSP and IEP. Individualized Family Service Plan(IFSP) Individualized Education Program(IEP) Ages: Read More

Pathways to Support: Where to Begin If Your Child Receives Services Through Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT)

When an infant or toddler receiving early intervention services from Washington’s Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT) program approaches the age of three (3), the Family Resource Coordinator (FRC) begins transition planning for when the child will age out of early intervention services on their third birthday. If the child is potentially eligible for Read More

Starting School: When and How to Enroll a Student in School

A Brief Overview Full Article If your child has never enrolled in school, back to school season can be a confusing time. This article answers frequently asked questions about school entrance age, compulsory education, and the enrollment process.  Note that “enrollment” and “registration” are used interchangeably regarding the steps leading up to a student starting Read More

Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3), Part 3: How the Compact Protects Academic Progress toward Graduation 

A Brief Overview  Full Article  The Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3, pronounced “mick three”) is the more commonly used name for the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children. MIC3’s rules provide consistent guidelines for how public schools address the most common challenges military-connected students experience during a PCS (permanent change of station, Read More

Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3), Part 2: Supporting Appropriate Placement and Inclusion of Military Families 

A Brief Overview  Full Article  The Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3, pronounced “mick three”) is the more commonly used name for the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children. MIC3’s rules provide consistent guidelines for how public schools address the most common challenges military-connected students experience during a PCS (permanent change of station, Read More

Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3), Part 1: The Impact of MIC3 on Military Families 

A Brief Overview  Full Article  The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children was created to provide a smooth transition for military children as their families relocate from installation to installation during a permanent change of station, or PCS (the military’s word for “relocation”). Often referred to as the MIC3 (“mick three”) for Military Read More

MIC3 Step-by-Step Checklist-Resolve School Issues with the Interstate Compact

This resource shows you specific steps to take to resolve school issues for your child, using the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children.  It gives you contact information for people who can help you with different situations covered by the Compact.  The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children (“the Compact”) is Read More

School to Adulthood: Transition Planning Toolkit for High School, Life, and Work

Looking to the future can feel exciting, hopeful, confusing, overwhelming—or all emotions at once. For families supporting a young person with a disability, it’s never too soon to begin planning to ensure a smooth process from the teen years toward whatever happens next. This toolkit supports families as they organize this multiyear project. For a Read More

Keeping Kids Busy Through Summer: Summer Camp Alternatives

A Brief Overview Full Article Summer camp is an excellent way for children to spend the long summer days. However, camps are often filled quickly, and many are out of the financial reach of families. Here are some alternatives to those summer camps to entertain children and give caregivers some much needed respite. Local parks Read More