Student Rights, IEP, Section 504 and More

Getting the right help for students with disabilities is made easier when families learn key vocabulary and understand how to use it. PAVE provides videos to support learning about student rights and how to work with the school to get individualized support. Video number 1: Pyramid of Rights Protections for Students With Disabilities The first Read More

Section 504: A Plan for Equity, Access and Accommodations

A Brief Overview Section 504 is part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which is upheld by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. Section 504 prohibits discrimination based on disability in any program or activity that receives federal funding. All Washington state public schools must comply with this federal law. Every student Read More

Links for 504

The Difference Between IEPs and 504 Plans: An agency called Understood.org provides a chart describing the differences between a Section 504 Plan and an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Sample 504 Plan for a Student with ADHD: Understood.org provides a variety of templates that can help families participate with school staff in designing educational support plans. Read More

Exploring Assistive Technology: Understanding, Access, and Resources for All Ages and Abilities

Brief overview: Full Article You can also type “assistive technology” in the search bar at wapave.org to find other articles where assistive technology is mentioned. What is assistive technology (AT)? Who uses it? Where is it used?Assistive technology (AT) is any item, device, or piece of equipment used by people with disabilities to maintain or Read More

IEP Tips: Evaluation, Present Levels, SMART goals

Getting services at school starts with evaluation. Eligible students get an individualized Education Program (IEP), which describes a student’s present levels of performance and how specially designed instruction supports progress toward annual goals. This article provides a quick overview of the basic IEP process and provides tips for family caregivers to get more involved. PAVE Read More

Pathways to Support: Where to Begin If Your Child Receives Services Through Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT)

When an infant or toddler receiving early intervention services from Washington’s Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT) program approaches the age of three (3), the Family Resource Coordinator (FRC) begins transition planning for when the child will age out of early intervention services on their third birthday. If the child is potentially eligible for Read More

Dyslexia Screening and Interventions: State Requirements and Resources

A Brief Overview Full Article A child who struggles to read can quickly fall behind in school. Nearly every learning area includes some reading, and children might become confused or frustrated when they don’t get help to make sense of their schoolwork. Behavior challenges can result, and sometimes schools and families struggle to understand why Read More

Parent Training and Information Program

PAVE’s program called Parent Training and Information (PTI) helps family caregivers, youth, and professionals with questions about services for children and young people with disabilities, ages 0-26. PTI provides direct help, training for groups, and access to resources. Click Get Help to fill out the form, and PTI staff will contact you to talk through your situation and provide information, Read More

Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3), Part 3: How the Compact Protects Academic Progress toward Graduation 

A Brief Overview  Full Article  The Military Interstate Children’s Compact Commission (MIC3, pronounced “mick three”) is the more commonly used name for the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunities for Military Children. MIC3’s rules provide consistent guidelines for how public schools address the most common challenges military-connected students experience during a PCS (permanent change of station, Read More

Back To School Checklist!

Late summer is the time to gather school supplies, find out what time the school bus will pick up and drop off, and prepare to find new classrooms and meet new teachers. Parents of students with disabilities have some additional things to check off the list to be ready for the year ahead. As August Read More

Disability Redetermination: What Happens to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) When a Child Turns 18?

A Brief Overview Full Article As a continuation to our article, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a monthly financial benefit from the Social Security Administration (SSA) to eligible children and adults. The SSA’s definitions of blind and disabled are the same for both adults and children, although there are some differences in eligibility requirements.  Definitions Read More

MIC3 Step-by-Step Checklist-Resolve School Issues with the Interstate Compact

This resource shows you specific steps to take to resolve school issues for your child, using the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children.  It gives you contact information for people who can help you with different situations covered by the Compact.  The Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children (“the Compact”) is Read More

School to Adulthood: Transition Planning Toolkit for High School, Life, and Work

Looking to the future can feel exciting, hopeful, confusing, overwhelming—or all emotions at once. For families supporting a young person with a disability, it’s never too soon to begin planning to ensure a smooth process from the teen years toward whatever happens next. This toolkit supports families as they organize this multiyear project. For a Read More

Requesting Accommodations in Post-Secondary Education

The following information is part of the college readiness workbook. You can download this and other parts of this workbook for your personal use. Each document is fillable. Post-secondary schools each set their own procedures and requirements to request accommodations. Here are some key points and tips on effective ways to request accommodations. Accessibility is Read More

LGBTQ+ and Disability Rights in School

A Brief Overview Full Article LGBTQ+ is an acronym that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (or sometimes questioning), and others. The “plus” represents other gender identities including pansexual and Two-Spirit. Youth and young adults with disabilities may also have diverse sexualities and gender identities. LGBTQ+ identities are NOT disabilities, but students with disabilities may Read More