Summer 2020 Recreation and Staycation Options

Summer activities might look different in 2020 because of measures to slow spread of COVID-19. Here are some links and ideas for accessible staycations and other recreation options. This list is subject to changes and updates. Have a suggestion to add? Send us an email: pave@wapave.org.

Please note that these resources are not affiliated with PAVE, and PAVE does not recommend or endorse these programs or services. This list is not exhaustive and is provided for informational purposes only.

Virtual Options

  • Crip Camp 2020: The Virtual Experience
    Join fellow grassroots activists and advocates this summer for a virtual camp experience featuring trailblazing speakers from the disability community. All are welcome, and no prior activism experience is necessary to participate.
  • Youth Leadership Forum
    A Facebook group called Friends of YLF provides the most up-to-date information about plans for a weeklong virtual camp in July 2020.
  • Visit your local library system
    This site provides contact information for Washington libraries. Many libraries offer online activities and options to make summer reading fun and rewarding.
  • Creativity Camp
    Register for a free week of writing, drawing and storytelling classes from award-winning author/illustrator Arree Chung. 
  • Camp Korey
    This 15-year-old program honors the courage, strength, and determination of children with serious medical conditions by providing a camp environment with specialized medical support. 2020 programs include virtual camps and campfire Fridays.
  • Taste of Home catalog of Free Virtual Museum Tours
    From the safety of home and for free, visit the Louvre, SeaWorld, the Winchester Mystery House and many more museums. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of Art provides a free 3-D tour of its exhibit halls.
  • National Parks Virtual Tours
    Insider provides links to virtual tours of 32 national parks, including the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, and Arches National Park.
  • NASA Kids’ Club and NASA STEM @ Home
    The NASA Kids’ Club offers video-style games and opportunities to learn about the work of NASA and the astronauts. The STEM @ Home programs provide interactive modules in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for grades K-4, 5-8, and 9-12.
  • Sesame Street Caring for Each Other
    Favorite Muppets provide sing-alongs, interactive games, and other ready-to-use materials to spark playful learning for the whole family during COVID-19 and beyond.
  • Storyline Online
    Have you noticed that there are a lot of famous people reading books? Storyline provides a place to find many of them in a virtual library.
  • Nomster Chef
    Picture-book recipes for Kid Chefs and added tips for grown-ups are designed for families cooking together at home.

In-Person Options

Please note that scheduling may change based on COVID-19 restrictions. Please check each program website for the most current information.

  • Spectra Gymnastics
    Programs are designed to support individuals with Autism, sensory issues, and related disorders, ages 2-21.
  • Aspiring Youth  
    Summer camp opportunities with in-person and online options. Camps provide opportunities to explore theater, art, climbing and more. 
  • Camp Killoqua 
    These Camp Fire programs are open to all — including youth who are not members of Camp Fire. Camps strive to be inclusive; acceptance and participation is open to everyone regardless of race, religion, socioeconomic status, disability, sexual orientation, or other aspect of diversity.
  • C.A.S.T. for Kids
    Catch a Special Thrill (C.A.S.T.) provides fishing events for kids with special needs. Check the interactive map and calendar for summer events near you.
  • Blue Compass Camps
    Sea Kayaking in the San Juan Islands is among the offerings for youth with high-functioning autism, Asperger’s, and ADHD.

Low-Tech Fun

  • Pirate Treasure Hunt: Dress up as pirates to follow clues that lead to a bounty of treasure! Decorate the house, offer goldfish- shaped crackers as snacks, and design an X to mark the spot where the treasure is found!
  • Under the Stars:  Stay up late to learn about astronomy. No cost apps like Sky Map and Star Walk help locate planets, stars, and constellations with ease. Make it fun on a warm night with a blanket on the grass to keep you comfy while you gaze up!
  • Unplug and get off the grid: Make a point to unplug and tune into fresh air, exercise, and nature. If you don’t already know an outdoor spot to explore, All Trails can help you find hiking or walking trails.
  • Check out PAVE’s Lessons at Home videos: We’ve got short, curiosity-inspiring projects that require limited equipment for those “I’m bored!” moments.
  • Practice being Mindful: Need a breath and a moment of peace? PAVE has short videos for creating mindfulness that are accessible for almost all ages/abilities.
  • For more ideas and information, PAVE provides two resource lists to help with learning at home and to support families navigating the national health emergency:

Holiday Survival Tips For Families with Special Healthcare Needs

Everyone can get overwhelmed around the Holidays. Routines are disrupted, different or excessive foods might be in easy reach, and emotional triggers can come from many directions. Individuals with disabilities might be especially sensitive to those issues. This article provides a four-part planning guide to help families manage a change in routine, plan for outings, provide special care and travel with children who have special needs during the holiday season.

Routine

  • Great Expectations

A schedule filled with events outside of a typical schedule may be disorienting to some children. Plan to follow a typical routine for some aspects of each day and discuss special events ahead of time so your child can feel prepared.

  • Children nestled all snug in their beds

Maintain your child’s sleep schedule to the best of your ability. Consistent wake-up and bedtime schedules can help everyone’s level of calm.

  • Three Bears Principle

Finding the “just-right” amount of holiday celebrating can be tricky. Don’t try to make it to all the holiday events. Choose wisely and feel free to decline invitations. A child who gets enough down time between events is more likely to enjoy the festivities.

Plan Ahead

  • Special Santa Sack

If your child has sensory sensitivity, have a bag of toys and tools ready to go so you’ll have options if a shopping trip, holiday party or other event gets over-stimulating. Some children take comfort from earplugs for noisy situations, headphones for listening to favorite music, electronics, fidgets, blankets, or extra comfy clothes.

  • Medicine

Have a bag ready to go with necessary medications, supplies, and equipment. You may want to pack extra for unexpected delays in your adventures. Sugary foods at holiday gatherings might impact planning for children who need diabetes care. You may choose to use an insulin pump to avoid multiple injections so your child can enjoy the holiday without feeling too different or overwhelmed.

  • Visions of Sugarplums

Holiday meals or treats might be off limits to children with specific allergies or food sensitivities. You may need to pack some back-up snacks and treats that work well. Being prepared could prevent your child from feeling left out of the festivities. If your child has a severe allergy, remind family and guests ahead of time to practice extra caution. Kissing and hugging can be dangerous due to cross-contamination.

Handle with Care

  • City sidewalks, busy sidewalks

Silver bells, strings of streetlights and all the other hustle and bustle may overwhelm children with sensory sensitivities. You may want to consider an off-hour time to see Santa or simply avoid the most popular attractions and choose quieter activities to help your child enjoy the season.

  • At Christmas, parents need a village

Don’t put all the pressure on yourself to make the holiday perfect. Ask for support from family, friends, doctors and therapists, and step back to let them do their parts to reinforce positive messages and expectations. 

  • Saying no can be nice

If a certain activity is simply too much for your child, you or other members of your family, it’s okay to say no! Choose what works best and toss the guilt if you need to decline an invitation.

  • Something under the tree, for me

Whether you go shopping, head to the spa, soak in the tub or simply pause to take five long breaths, plan some self-care. Remember that when you put on your own oxygen mask first, you’ll be stronger and more prepared to help others.

  • Thanks is a gift

Taking time to reflect on gratitude can help shift you away from feeling overwhelmed and toward feelings of peacefulness and grace. It’s ok if things don’t go as planned and it’s ok that your family is different. Your holiday might require a little extra planning and patience, but your child’s life is a gift that can be treasured for its unique specialness.

Not Home for Christmas?

If your holiday includes planes and trains, be sure to let agents and attendants know about your family member’s special accommodation needs. Here are a few contacts for Washington travelers:

Sea-Tac Airport (preflight preparations available): email customerservice@portseattle.org

Spokane Airport Administrative Offices: (509) 455-6455

Amtrak Accessibility services