Stay Cool when Summer Heats Up

Summertime brings special challenges for families whose children have special needs. Some medical conditions and medications make individuals particularly susceptible to the heat. Be sure to check with your doctor about which medications might increase heat sensitivity.

Keep in mind that extreme heat combined with humidity can make a person even more vulnerable. It’s harder for the body to sweat and cool itself off when the humidity rises, making it even harder to maintain a healthy body temperature.

The US Department of Homeland Security manages a website, Ready.gov, to help people prepare for and mitigate emergencies, including a variety of natural and man-made disasters. The website offers articles translated into a variety of languages. The campaign provides these bits of advice related to the risks of extremely hot weather:

  • Extreme heat can occur quickly and without warning.
  • Older adults, children, and sick or overweight individuals are at greater risk from extreme heat.
  • Humidity increases the feeling of heat as measured by a heat index.

Here are a few ideas for your family when the heat is on:

  • Stay indoors and in an air-conditioned environment as much as possible unless you know your body has a high tolerance for heat.
  • Drink plenty of fluids but avoid beverages that contain alcohol, caffeine or a lot of sugar.
  • Eat more frequently, but make sure meals are balanced and light.
  • Never leave any person or pet in a parked vehicle.
  • Avoid dressing babies in heavy clothing or wrapping them in warm blankets.
  • Check frequently on people who are elderly, ill or may need help. If you might need help, arrange to have family, friends or neighbors check in with you at least twice a day throughout warm weather periods.
  • Make sure pets have plenty of water.
  • Salt tablets should only be taken if specified by your doctor. If you are on a salt-restrictive diet, check with a doctor before increasing salt intake.
  • If you take prescription diuretics, antihistamines, mood-altering or antispasmodic drugs, check with a doctor about the effects of sun and heat exposure.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun. Awnings and window coverings can reduce the heat entering a house by as much as 80 percent.

If you go outside:

  • Plan strenuous outdoor activities for early or late in the day, when temperatures are cooler.
  • Take frequent breaks when working outdoors.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sun block and light-colored, loose-fitting clothes when outdoors.
  • At first signs of heat illness (dizziness, nausea, headaches, muscle cramps), move to a cooler location, rest for a few minutes and slowly drink a cool beverage. Seek medical attention immediately if you do not feel better.
  • Avoid sunburn, which slows the skin’s ability to cool itself. Use a sunscreen lotion with a high SPF (sun protection factor) rating.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes. A cool shower immediately after coming in from hot temperatures can result in hypothermia, particularly for elderly or very young people.

If the power goes out or air conditioning is not available

  • If air conditioning is not available, stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine.
  • Ask your doctor about any prescription medicine you keep refrigerated. (If the power goes out, most medicine will be fine to leave in a closed refrigerator for at least 3 hours.)
  • Keep a few bottles of water in your freezer; if the power goes out, move them to your refrigerator and keep the doors shut.

The Washington State Department of Health lists additional ideas through its website. Some Extreme Heat Cooling Centers in Washington State are listed through the state’s 211 Information Network.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

WHAT IS SSI?

SSI is a monthly financial benefit from the Social Security Administration to people with limited income and resources who are age 65 or older, blind or disabled.  Blind or disabled children, as well as adults, can get SSI.

In most states, SSI determination is required for Medicaid eligibility of children with disabilities.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Financial Determination
  • Parental income is deemed, counted then prorated among the family members
  • Exclusions
  • Income includes Earned and Unearned Income
  • Parental Resources are counted
  • Disability Determination

Specific requirements:

Marked and severe functional limitations as defined by the Social Security Administration the limitations must have lasted or are supposed to last for a continuous period of 12 months or longer

The decision is made by a State Agency, Disability Determination Service, specifically,  a team composed of a disability examiner and a medical or psychological consultant

What does the Social Security Administration Need?

  • Social Security Card for all children
  • Proof of Age—Birth Certificate for all children
  • Citizenship—Birth Certificate
  • Proof of Income—3 months LES
  • Earned-wages and special pays
  • Unearned Income-BAH/quarters and BAS

Proof of Resources:

  • Bank statements
  • Deed or tax appraisal
  • Insurance Policies
  • Certificates of Deposit, Stocks and Bonds

Proof of Living Arrangements:

  • Deed, tax bill, or lease receipt
  • Medical Assistance Cards
  • Information about household costs, (utilities)

Medical Sources of Information:

  • Medical Reports stating disability
  • Names, addresses and telephone numbers of doctors and other medical service providers
  • Names and Documentation on how disability affects the day-to-day activities.

How To Apply?

Go to local Social Security Office, ideally in the middle of month for faster service

Call the SSA office at 1-800-772-1213

While stationed overseas and you think your child may be eligible for SSI, you can apply by contacting the Federal Benefits Unit at the following Embassies or Consulates:

Germany Federal Benefits Unit
American Consulate General
Giessener Str. 30
60435 Frankfurt, Germany
Phone: 49-69-7535-2496
Fax:  49-69-749-352

England Federal Benefits Unit
American Embassy
24/31 Grosvenor Square
W1AW 2LQ London, England
Phone: 44-207-499-9000
Fax: 44-207-495-7200

Japan American Embassy
Federal Benefits Unit
1-10-5 Akasaka
Minato-ku, Tokyo
107-8420 Japan
Phone: 81-3-3224-5000
Fax: 81-3-3505-1862

Korea Social Security Division
Veterans Affairs
Regional Office
American Embassy
1131 Roxas Boulevard
0930 Manila, Philippines
Phone: 63-522-4716 or 63-2-526-5936
Fax:  632-522-1514

Things to Remember

  • It can take up to 180 days for approval.
  • Payments are retroactive to the date of application.  Your initial contact may be considered the date of contact.
  • 1 of every 5 applications are denied—APPEAL.*
  • When talking about the disability discuss the worst days, not the best.
  • It is necessary to complete both disability and financial determinations when assessing eligibility. This is because SSI eligibility determination may be used in other programs within your state.
  • Establishing the disability eligibility will enable your child to receive SSI when they turn 18 and the parent’s income is no longer considered, or if their economic situation changes.
  • *Tip: Appeals to decisions are common and a right for your child
  • Special Consideration for military families OCONUS
  • Continuation of SSI benefits for families who PCS CONUS to OCONUS who meet the following criteria:
  • Was eligible to receive SSI in the month before parent reported for duty overseas—payments will continue from the state you last were eligible

Report information regarding:

  • Moves of the child
  • People move into or out of the home
  • Changes of financial status
  • Leaving the Armed Forces and remaining overseas

For more information visit the SSI web page

“Working Together with Military Families of Individuals with DisAbilities!”