Help for Understanding Health Insurance

Healthcare insurance includes words and abbreviations that can be confusing and hard to remember. This article describes a few key terms to demystify the health insurance world for Washington State families. Washington Healthplanfinder.org is a place to research insurance options statewide, with English and Spanish options.

Managed Care Organization (MCO)

A Managed Care Organization (MCO) is an agency that coordinates medical services and reimburses providers.

State medical insurance in Washington is called Apple Health. Apple Health pays a monthly premium to an MCO that an individual or family chooses to manage preventive, primary, specialty, and other health services. Apple Health also pays for some services directly, through Fee for Service (FFS).

The term “provider” describes any health care professional or facility that provides treatment. Doctors, nurses, mental health professionals, physician assistants, dentists, therapists, behavior specialists, and many other professionals are considered providers.

Clients enrolled in managed care must seek providers who are part of their plan’s network unless there is an emergency or prior authorization is arranged. Prior authorization means the insurance company agrees to pay for a service, treatment, prescription drug, medical equipment, or something else because it is determined to be medically necessary.

The Apple Health system includes five MCOs. Not all plans are available in all areas of Washington State. ​

  • Amerigroup (AMG)
  • Community Health Plan of Washington (CHPW)
  • Coordinated Care of Washington (CCW)
  • Molina Healthcare of Washington, Inc (MHW)
  • United Healthcare Community Plan (UHC)

For complicated circumstances, an MCO may recommend a case manager be assigned to support an individual’s care. Families also have the option to request case management, especially if locating providers is difficult to meet unique or substantial needs.

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

A Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) is a type of MCO.  An HMO is an independent system that requires enrollees to seek care within a specific network of hospitals and providers. An HMO plan is based on a network of providers who agree to coordinate care in return for a certain payment rate for their services. 

Preferred Provider Organization (PPO)

A Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) is another type of MCO. A PPO generally will allow individuals to choose their providers and does not limit reimbursement to providers in a specific network. Because of that, a PPO tends to be more expensive than an HMO.

What is the difference between Medicaid and Medicare?

Medicaid is income dependent, and Medicare is not. Both provide government-funded healthcare.

Medicaid is state-managed to provide free or low-cost medical coverage for individuals or families who qualify based on income. Washington’s Medicaid program is Apple Health.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program for individuals age 65 and older and for those with qualifying disabilities. Medicare is not dependent on income.

Copayments, Premiums, and Deductibles

When healthcare is not free, the cost to the family adds up through the copayments, premiums, and deductibles. Here’s what that means:

  • Copayment: a specific fee for a visit or procedure.
  • Premium: payment for the insurance. An individual might have premiums withheld from a paycheck, or an employer might agree to pay all or part of the premium.
  • Deductible: the amount of money an individual must pay each year before insurance payments “kick in.” After a deductible is met, the patient may still make copayments or pay a percentage of the cost, depending on the plan. Supplemental insurance through Medicare is sometimes an option to cover deductible expenses.

What is a Medicaid Waiver?

A Medicaid waiver allows the federal government to waive rules that usually apply to the Medicaid program. The intention is to reimburse for services that would not otherwise be covered by Medicaid. Waivers generally provide local, non-institutional solutions for individuals with disabilities. For example, in-home care paid for through a waiver might support someone to live in the community.

Medicaid.gov provides a Washington Waiver Fact Sheet that outlines waiver programs available in Washington State.

An Illustration of the insurance terms described in this document

Download the illustration as a PDF – Health Illustrative

Technology Provides Options for Medical Care from a Distance

A Brief Overview

  • During the coronavirus pandemic and statewide stay-home orders, some providers are offering online appointments. This article includes information about access to telehealth and how to prepare for a virtual visit.
  • Federal privacy laws have been relaxed during the shutdown to allow more opportunities for on-screen healthcare. Washington’s telemedicine parity law was updated by the 2015 legislature. Those updates went into effect in 2017 (SSB 5175).
  • Generally, military families with TRICARE and families with state insurance, Apple Health, have coverage for medically necessary services provided through telemedicine.
  • A 6-minute video tutorial from the Hawaii Department of Health provides information about what to expect during a telehealth session.
  • Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is providing free cell phones and minutes to low-income families through a federal program called Lifeline. State-specific information about this option is available from the Health Care Authority.
  • See Links to Support Families during the Coronavirus Crisis for additional resources.

Full Article

Families staying home during the coronavirus pandemic need new ways to access medical care. Onscreen appointments—telehealth, telemedicine, teleintervention, telepsychiatry—meet some needs.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (hhs.gov) in early March 2020 relaxed legal requirements related to confidentiality in order to support the delivery of telehealth services while families shelter in place. Roger Severino, director of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), issued the following statement: “We are empowering medical providers to serve patients wherever they are during this national public health emergency. We are especially concerned about reaching those most at risk, including older persons and persons with disabilities.”

The federal guidance refers to confidentiality rules under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). The HHS website states that OCR will use discretion and relax compliance under HIPAA if services are delivered in good faith:

“During the COVID-19 national emergency, which also constitutes a nationwide public health emergency, covered health care providers subject to the HIPAA Rules may seek to communicate with patients, and provide telehealth services, through remote communications technologies.  Some of these technologies, and the manner in which they are used by HIPAA-covered health care providers, may not fully comply with the requirements of the HIPAA Rules.”

Washington State has grown telehealth since 2015

Even before social distancing requirements, virtual appointments for diagnoses and treatments that don’t require direct physical examination have gained popularity. Before COVID-19 took hold, Washington’s 2020 legislature passed HB 2728 to support further development of children’s behavioral health services delivered through telemedicine.

In order to meet needs in some rural communities and underserved fields, such as psychiatry, Washington’s telemedicine parity law was updated by the 2015 legislature. Those updates went into effect in 2017 (SSB 5175).

The law enables providers to seek reimbursement for most services provided virtually if those same services would be covered by insurance if they were delivered in person. The law defines telemedicine as “the delivery of health care services through the use of interactive audio and video technology, permitting real-time communication between the patient at the originating site and the provider, for the purpose of diagnosis, consultation, or treatment.”

Telephone (“audio only”) services or provider guidance by facsimile (FAX) or email may not be covered. Families can check with their insurance carrier to make sure an appointment would be covered if video could fail during the appointment or is unavailable because of a technology complication.

Generally, telemedicine is covered by insurance if:

  • The payor would cover the service if it was provided in-person, and the service can reasonably be provided without direct contact.
  • The health care service is medically necessary.
  • The service is recognized as an essential health benefit under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Individual providers create their own policies about whether they provide services electronically, and the parity law doesn’t guarantee equal reimbursement. Washington is part of the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, making it easier for providers to get licensed in multiple states and provide services to a broader clientele, including through telemedicine.

Families with Medicaid in Washington State, which is called Apple Health, can find information related to telehealth from the Health Care Authority. In keeping with federal guidance, Medicaid in general is reimbursing telehealth services at the same rate they would reimburse in-person services during the pandemic.

TRICARE expands options for military families, including ABA

TRICARE provides coverage for medically necessary telemedicine visits from providers who offer that service. Preventive health screenings, psychiatric care and medication consultations are examples of appointments that are most easily held virtually. Depending on the TRICARE plan, an authorization or referral may be needed.

In addition, TRICARE is extending telehealth for families who access Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and are enrolled in the Autism Care Demonstration (ACD) March 31- May 31, 2020. This temporary extension includes ABA support to parents/caregivers, and the services don’t require the child to be present at the telehealth appointment.

How do I prepare for a telemedicine appointment?

Before services are rendered, providers are required to seek informed consent from patients and/or legal guardians and to provide information about how the technology works and how privacy is protected. Electronic signatures are generally acceptable, particularly as the state requires social distancing. The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) provides a downloadable guidebook about telehealth

Prepare for a routine check-up like you would if you were visiting the clinic: Write down questions and concerns, including any changes related to health or medication. A visual tutorial, created by the Department of Health in Hawaii, walks through the different types of telehealth and what someone might expect.

If you suspect COVID-19, carefully document symptoms. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) provide a COVID-19 screening tool. Be sure to note anything about the illness or its possible treatment that might be affected by a disability condition.

If testing is prescribed, a drive-through testing site may be suggested. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) affords individuals the right to accommodations when accessing what is publicly available. The Northwest ADA Center provides guidance about drive-through testing, specifically addressing topics related to blindness, deafness or wheelchair access, for example. Prepare for the telehealth appointment with any questions related to drive-through testing and disability, if that topic might come up.

What if I don’t have internet or a cell phone?

Families who do not have internet at home may be able to get service for free or low cost because of the pandemic. Some internet providers offer free internet for a limited time, based on income. Internet Essentials from Comcast and Charter Communications are examples. Their services are based on income, and students with free and reduced lunches are among those who may qualify.

Washington’s  Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is providing free cell phones and minutes to low-income families through a federal program called Lifeline. State-specific information about this option is available from the Health Care Authority.

How can I plan for an in-person doctor visit or emergency?

Children with complex medical needs may still need an in-person doctor visit for some conditions. General guidance is to call ahead if there is concern that anyone in the family might be ill so medical staff can take precautions to protect everyone from exposure to illness. In many locations, individuals are screened and checked for fever before they enter the facility.

For a medical emergency, prepare to offer first-responders clear information about the nature of the emergency. If a member of your household has a chronic condition that may create an urgent care situation, prepare a handout with basic information in advance. PAVE’s article about a Care Notebook might help. Because personal protective equipment (masks, gloves, gowns) are in short supply, responders will send minimal staff for less urgent circumstances. If the situation is clearly life or death, a larger team may suit up with personal protective equipment in order to help.

Many dental offices have closed, although some may remain open for emergency procedures. Call ahead: Schedules and policies are changing rapidly.

Caregivers of children with complex needs face additional challenges

Being the caregiver for a child with significant medical needs adds additional layers to current circumstances. Here are questions some will face:

  • Is my child’s medical need worth the risk of exposure to a hospital setting?
  • What are the short-term and long-term considerations in changing the plan for care during this time of national crisis?

The answers obviously are personal and different for every family’s circumstances.

While facing tough choices and uncertain times, your self-care is critical, and PAVE offers an article with ideas just for you. Of course, start with the basics: breathe with intention, nourish your body and seek points of fun and connection each day. Staying connected to a child’s care team can help, so you’re already in touch if there’s an emergent medical situation.

PAVE’s Family-to-Family Health Information Center continues to provide information for families and caregivers of children with disabilities and special healthcare needs in Washington State. Fill out a Helpline Request Form at wapave.org for individualized assistance.

New Immigration Rules: Public Services May Impact Eligibility for U.S. Residency

On Feb. 24, 2020, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) implemented new rules nationwide that impact immigrants who wish to become permanent or long-term residents. Since the policy change, some benefits that families receive may count against them if they apply for residency.

Called Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds, the new rule prohibits permanent residency if an individual relies on or is likely to rely on public resources for housing, food or healthcare assistance. The changes were implemented in response to a Supreme Court ruling.

Previously, persons may have been eligible for residency if they did not primarily depend on government funds. According to the USCIS, the new rule requires that a potential resident will not depend on government funds at all.  A person applying for residency must demonstrate current and potential income. Non-residents already in the United States may be impacted if they continue to access government resources and wish to stay or make their residency status permanent.

What programs are included?

  • Medicaid for adults over 21 (expectations are made for emergencies, pregnant women, and those who have given birth in the last 60 days)
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
  • General Assistance programs from government agencies that give cash support or income maintenance
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP or Food Stamps)
  • Housing Assistance, including public housing, Section 8, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash benefits

Benefits Excluded from Public Charge

  • Emergency medical assistance
  • Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
  • Medicaid for children under 21
  • Disaster relief
  • State, local, or tribal programs (other than cash assistance)
  • Community-based programs, such as soup kitchens, crisis counseling and intervention, and short-term shelter
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) non-cash benefits
  • Supplemental Nutrition for Women Infants and Children (WIC)
  • School Breakfast and Lunch programs
  • Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
  • Transportation vouchers or services
  • Pell Grants and student loans
  • Childcare services
  • Head Start
  • Job training programs

Who is Affected?

Most individuals seeking permanent residency with a Green Card are affected.  Use of public benefits may also damage a non-resident’s attempt to extend temporary residency in the U.S.

Individuals who may be exempt or eligible for a waiver

  • Refugees
  • Asylum applicants
  • Refugees and asylees applying for adjustment to permanent resident status
  • Amerasian Immigrants
  • Individuals granted relief under the Cuban Adjustment Act (CAA), Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act (NACARA), or Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act (HRIFA)
  • Individuals applying for a T or U Visa
  • Individuals with a T or U Visa who are trying to become a permanent resident with a Green Card
  • Applicants for Temporary Protected Status (TPS)
  • Certain applicants under the LIFE Act Provisions

Are there any exceptions?

The USCIS has announced that “inadmissibility based on the public charge ground is determined by the totality of the circumstances.” While use of public charge funds will count against individuals applying for residency, they are not the sole factor in the government’s decision to approve or deny residency requests. Here are additional resources:

American Immigration Lawyers Association: Public Charge Changes at USCIS, DOJ, and DOS

Public Charge Fact Sheet

Reuters: “U.S. Supreme Court lets hardline Trump immigration policy take effect”

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services: Public Charge

 

Children’s Long-Term Inpatient Program (CLIP) Provides Residential Psychiatric Treatment

A Brief Overview

  • CLIP serves children ages 5-18 by providing residential mental-health treatment for a long-term stay that usually lasts 6-12 months. Read on for more information about CLIP eligibility and how to initiate a referral.
  • Governor Jay Inslee in December recommended $675 million in new funding for behavioral health improvements statewide, and policymakers are working on a variety of bills during the 2019 legislative session. Families can contact lawmakers to participate in advocacy.
  • The state has a Stakeholder Advisory Group discussing issues related to Parent-Initiated Treatment. A group of engaged parents participates in a conversation on a Facebook page called Support SB 5706.
  • Studies show that 1 in 5 children will suffer from mental illness. PAVE has additional articles and webinars about mental health education in school, suicide and Social Emotional Learning.

Full Article

Families have few options to help a child with a psychiatric illness that makes in-home, community-based care unworkable. Local hospitals are designed to provide crisis care and generally do not keep a patient for mental health treatment and recovery beyond a few days or weeks. Sometimes those short hospitalizations are not long enough to offer true stability that allows a child to return to school and life with successful outcomes.

One choice is to apply for the Children’s Long-Term Inpatient Program (CLIP), a state program that manages 89 beds in five locations throughout Washington. Most CLIP referrals are for children with Medicaid—public health insurance. Families with private health insurance have access to CLIP but may be referred first to private facilities for long-term, inpatient care. Medicaid is the payer of last resort.

Who is Eligible for CLIP?

  • Youth ages 5 to 18
  • Legal residents of Washington State
  • Youth diagnosed with a severe psychiatric disorder
  • Youth possessing a risk to themselves or others
  • Youth who warrant care under the supervision of a psychiatrist because of grave disability due to psychiatric illness
  • Youth who are not successfully treated through community-based mental health resources

CLIP serves children ages 5-18 by providing residential mental-health treatment for a long-term stay that usually lasts 6-12 months. Please note that eligibility for CLIP ends on the child’s 18th birthday.

Parents/legal guardians engage with the treatment team while the child is at the CLIP facility. The goal is to help the child stabilize and provide the family with the tools needed for a successful return to the home, school and community. Children attend school while at CLIP, and teachers manage any Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 plan that travels with the student from the local district.

Parents and legal guardians can refer children to CLIP by applying through one of the regional committees positioned throughout the state. Contact information for regional committee leadership is available through the CLIP website. The regional committee meets with the family to discuss the case and determine whether to refer the case to the CLIP Administration for review. The state committee then determines whether to approve the case for CLIP. Sometimes a child is put on a waiting list for an available bed.

Please note that families need an organized set of medical and school paperwork to complete CLIP applications. Refer to PAVE’s article about document management for guidance about how to create a care notebook or other filing system for this and other purposes.

The regional CLIP committee includes care providers from managed care organizations and other agencies that may provide additional support and resources to the family, regardless of whether a CLIP referral is recommended. Generally, the committee determines that all community-care options have been exhausted before recommending a more restrictive placement through CLIP. The team will also make a recommendation based on whether the child is likely to benefit from the therapeutic program, which is mental-health based and may not be a good fit for an individual with a severe form of developmental or intellectual disability.

The largest CLIP facility is the Child Study and Treatment Center (CSTC) in Lakewood, adjacent to Western State Hospital. CSTC provides 47 beds in cottages that house children in groups by age. Additional options include:

  • Burien, Sunstone Youth Treatment Center: 10 beds
  • Tacoma, The Pearl Street Center: 12 beds
  • Spokane, the Tamarack Center: 16 beds
  • Yakima, Two Rivers Landing: 4 CLIP beds in a facility with 16 total youth beds

Parents can initiate a referral, but children over Washington’s Age of Consent (13) must volunteer to go to a CLIP facility unless a county Designated Crisis Responder (DCR) determines the child meets the state’s criteria for a 180-day commitment under the Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA). Any persons over the age of 13 in Washington must be imminently threatening to harm themselves or others or be severely gravely disabled, in a state of extreme psychiatric deterioration, to receive an ITA admission to any inpatient facility.

Wording from Washington’s gravely disabled statute is as follows: “Manifests severe deterioration in routine functioning evidenced by repeated and escalating loss of cognitive or volitional control over his or her actions and is not receiving such care as is essential for his or her health or safety.”

State lawmakers are engaged in work to consider changes to the ITA law, and families are invited to contact policymakers if they have thoughts or concerns to share about this initiative or other activities related to treatment access, Age of Consent laws or Parent-Initiated Treatment. Governor Jay Inslee in December recommended $675 million in new funding for behavioral health improvements statewide.

CLIP is funded with state and federal dollars. A child’s Medicaid case manager through a Managed Care Organization (Molina, Community Health Plan of Washington, Coordinated Care, Amerigroup or United Healthcare) can provide guidance about CLIP applications. Families also can request further information from a care management team through the Wraparound with Intensive Services (WISe) program, which provides outpatient care coordination for children with intensive psychiatric needs in various Washington communities. A CLIP referral often happens because WISe was unable to help the child stabilize in the home.

WISe is managed through the state’s Health Care Authority, and HCA is another source for information about various options for mental healthcare for Medicaid-eligible children, youth and families. Families can reach out to the HCA for further information.

 

 

 

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

WHAT IS SSI?

SSI is a monthly financial benefit from the Social Security Administration to people with limited income and resources who are age 65 or older, blind or disabled.  Blind or disabled children, as well as adults, can get SSI.

In most states, SSI determination is required for Medicaid eligibility of children with disabilities.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Financial Determination
  • Parental income is deemed, counted then prorated among the family members
  • Exclusions
  • Income includes Earned and Unearned Income
  • Parental Resources are counted
  • Disability Determination

Specific requirements:

Marked and severe functional limitations as defined by the Social Security Administration the limitations must have lasted or are supposed to last for a continuous period of 12 months or longer

The decision is made by a State Agency, Disability Determination Service, specifically,  a team composed of a disability examiner and a medical or psychological consultant

What does the Social Security Administration Need?

  • Social Security Card for all children
  • Proof of Age—Birth Certificate for all children
  • Citizenship—Birth Certificate
  • Proof of Income—3 months LES
  • Earned-wages and special pays
  • Unearned Income-BAH/quarters and BAS

Proof of Resources:

  • Bank statements
  • Deed or tax appraisal
  • Insurance Policies
  • Certificates of Deposit, Stocks and Bonds

Proof of Living Arrangements:

  • Deed, tax bill, or lease receipt
  • Medical Assistance Cards
  • Information about household costs, (utilities)

Medical Sources of Information:

  • Medical Reports stating disability
  • Names, addresses and telephone numbers of doctors and other medical service providers
  • Names and Documentation on how disability affects the day-to-day activities.

How To Apply?

Go to local Social Security Office, ideally in the middle of month for faster service

Call the SSA office at 1-800-772-1213

While stationed overseas and you think your child may be eligible for SSI, you can apply by contacting the Federal Benefits Unit at the following Embassies or Consulates:

Germany Federal Benefits Unit
American Consulate General
Giessener Str. 30
60435 Frankfurt, Germany
Phone: 49-69-7535-2496
Fax:  49-69-749-352

England Federal Benefits Unit
American Embassy
24/31 Grosvenor Square
W1AW 2LQ London, England
Phone: 44-207-499-9000
Fax: 44-207-495-7200

Japan American Embassy
Federal Benefits Unit
1-10-5 Akasaka
Minato-ku, Tokyo
107-8420 Japan
Phone: 81-3-3224-5000
Fax: 81-3-3505-1862

Korea Social Security Division
Veterans Affairs
Regional Office
American Embassy
1131 Roxas Boulevard
0930 Manila, Philippines
Phone: 63-522-4716 or 63-2-526-5936
Fax:  632-522-1514

Things to Remember

  • It can take up to 180 days for approval.
  • Payments are retroactive to the date of application.  Your initial contact may be considered the date of contact.
  • 1 of every 5 applications are denied—APPEAL.*
  • When talking about the disability discuss the worst days, not the best.
  • It is necessary to complete both disability and financial determinations when assessing eligibility. This is because SSI eligibility determination may be used in other programs within your state.
  • Establishing the disability eligibility will enable your child to receive SSI when they turn 18 and the parent’s income is no longer considered, or if their economic situation changes.
  • *Tip: Appeals to decisions are common and a right for your child
  • Special Consideration for military families OCONUS
  • Continuation of SSI benefits for families who PCS CONUS to OCONUS who meet the following criteria:
  • Was eligible to receive SSI in the month before parent reported for duty overseas—payments will continue from the state you last were eligible

Report information regarding:

  • Moves of the child
  • People move into or out of the home
  • Changes of financial status
  • Leaving the Armed Forces and remaining overseas

For more information visit the SSI web page

“Working Together with Military Families of Individuals with DisAbilities!”