OSPI Provides Guidance for Families

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) is the agency responsible for oversight of all public schools and non-public agencies in Washington State. In addition to supporting schools, OSPI provides resources and support directed toward students and families. OSPI upgraded its website (k12.wa.us) in July 2019. The home page provides news about current events, Read More

Special Education Parent Advisory Councils (SEPACs) Bring Parents to the Table

A Brief Overview Parents and schools can learn step-by-step how to create and manage a SEPAC through the downloadable Advocacy in Action guidebook. An informal webinar about SEPACs is freely available through Facebook. Parents and schools who want to learn more about special education process, rights and responsibilities can reach out to PAVE’s Parent Training Read More

How to Prepare for a DDA Assessment

Here are tips for getting ready for an assessment with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), which is managed by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). Be sure to send information to the DDA case manager ahead of time and keep a copy. If you save the assessment electronically in Word/Google Documents, Read More

Washington’s 2019 Law Adjusts Graduation Requirements

The Washington State Legislature passed a law in 2019 that changes graduation requirements and may impact students who receive special education services. House Bill (HB) 1599 changes the rules about which tests students must pass in order to graduate and how they can earn a diploma.   The new law removes the direct link between statewide Read More

Tips for Parents: Summer Provides Time to Reinforce Positive Behaviors at Home

A Brief Overview A tidal wave of emotional meltdowns can douse a family during summer break. Read on for tips to create a positive home environment that encourages expected behaviors. A key concept from Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is that punishment doesn’t teach children and youth what they should do instead. Adults can Read More